helping you master customer insight leadership

Poll: Interim results

SouthwarkFirstly, the normal health warning on these being only interim results. There are not yet sufficient votes with which to draw robust conclusions (hence the metaphor of a deserted Southwark station).

That said, with just over 80 votes now in, the initial results of our “What do you see?” survey of customer insight leaders is showing some interesting results.

With regard to the scope of the term “customer insight” almost all voters view this as covering research, analysis, modelling, segmentation and marketing effectiveness measurement, together with a consultancy service. Only slightly less popular is measurement of a primary customer metric (NPS, Satisfaction or Effort).  The surprise to me is that only just over half would include data management or database marketing. I am writing for the next quarterly publication of DataIQ magazine on the importance to CI leaders of data teams, so it will be interesting to see if this trend continues.

Meanwhile, with regard to current organisational design, or which elements of the above currently report into the CI leader, it’s a different story. Less of you voted, so less robust conclusions. But for now, the theme seems to be more CI leaders have responsibility for research, NPS and marketing effectiveness measurement. Far fewer appear to have responsibility for behavioural analysis and customer data management. So, perhaps not as many companies as I hoped have yet seen the benefits of bringing research and analysis together in one function.

It’s encouraging for my new business to see overwhelming interest in external support for CI leaders, with the most popular service being training for their customer insight team. So, time for me to get ready that training material.

Thanks again to those who participated. If you haven’t voted yet, please do and I’ll share final results once votes are high enough to feel more representative of this community.

Finally, do let me know if you’ve a question that you would like ask other customer insight leaders.

Offshoring Analytics: is it worth it?

offshoringPlanning to be offshoring analytics to meet demand? Read this first.

There has been much on LinkedIn and Twitter in recent months about the shortfall in analytical resource, for the USA & UK markets especially.

Several years ago I had the learning experience of attempting offshoring analytics to India, Bangalore to be precise.

It was all very exciting at first, flying out there and working with the team whilst visiting the UK. International experience for what had been a more UK focussed leadership role.

Plus, on paper, it looked a good idea to address the peaks and troughs of demand for analysis and modelling.

The pitch successfully communicated the ease of accessing highly trained Indian graduates at a fraction of UK wages. However, as with all software demos, the experience after purchase was a little different. (more…)

How are you navigating the leadership pipeline?

leadership pipeline

It’s unusual for me to recommend a book that I don’t consider that well written, but Leadership Pipeline is such a book. The reason for my recommendation is this book effectively covers a key challenge for leaders & organisations. It also introduces a really useful model and set of tools.

My criticism is only the writing style. Perhaps I’ve spent too many years enjoying well crafted prose in fiction but I find the style used throughout this book to be a little wooden or clunky, certainly not a joy to read.

However, I would encourage you to persist as the rewards are worth it. (more…)

Poll: What do you see?

Seeing ShopTo provide a research basis for the content included in this blog, I am asking all customer insight leaders who visit this site to complete the short survey below. Knowing the scope of your roles and your views as to the true breadth of ‘customer insight’ will enable me to ensure that I balance the content published here to better suit your interests.

I will of course share the results, which will hopefully be of interest to you all.

So, if you are a customer insight leader, please complete this survey:

 

Thank you.

 

Event: Forrester Customer Insights Council 2014

Forrester ResearchIn May 2014, I attended this council run by Forrester Research. For those not familiar with Forrester they are one of the biggest global research firms providing independent advice on technology and suppliers (another being Gartner). Unlike Gartner, I have always found Forrester to be more open to focussing on business decision makers and the technology needs of Marketing, Operations and Insight leaders. Gartner has some very able thinkers (including Ed Thompson and Gareth Herschel), but their US parent seems to keep pulling them back to focus on the needs of CIOs and their IT teams.

Anyway, thanks to the kind invitation from Jeff Brown (Principal Advisor on CI and my key contact when I had a seat with them), I attended my second CI Council and once again found it helpful. One of it’s key benefits is the absence of consultants and suppliers (I was still working for Lloyds at this time). Plus Jeff and his team do well to attract the actual Customer Insight leaders from the organisations represented, so there is real understanding of one another’s challenges. It tends to be a small select gathering (15-20), with both Banks & Insurers disproportionately represented, which suited me fine.

It is a confidential, Chatham House rules, meeting (which is also helpful) so I am limited in what I can share. But I thought it would be useful to both let my readers know that this exists (ask Jeff if you’d like to attend in future) and to highlight a few topics which were covered this year:

  • Innovating your Customer Insights offering to add value (inc. assessing CI capability – something that I also offer);
  • Leveraging Marketing Technology for Improved Results (inc. marketing automation);
  • The Tools CI Pros need to usher in Customer Obsession (inc. strategy & processes – again I also offer this service).

If you are considering paying for Forrester’s services, rather than just negotiating a free attendance, a few learning points from when I paid for their services: (a) Remember that they are a research company not a typical consultancy, so think of where research or best practice models can help you not just general support & advice; (b) Especially when arranging calls with a specific Forrester expert, you will get out what you put in – i.e be sure to have a very clear brief and clear focus for the call, otherwise you can waste time explaining your internal language or trying to cover too many points at a superficial level.

Anyway, I hope that’s of interest and helped – let me know if not! I have no relationship with Forrester but am grateful to Jeff for the invite and wanted to let other Customer Insight leaders know that this forum is available and worth considering.

Do comment below if you have ever attended and have any thoughts on where Forrester can add value (or not) for CI leaders.

Poll: Which breed of CI leader are you?

Colourful BullIf you watch the actions and listen to the language used by most CEOs, especially where they choose to focus their time, you can often guess their background. What I mean is their functional leadership background, whether that be finance, marketing, operations, sales, etc. This, of course, is only natural and probably reveals their area of greatest interest or where they feel most comfortable. As a leader we can all have the tendency to spend a little too much time in our comfort zone or pet projects.

This got me to thinking, does such a bias affect customer insight leaders? Do leaders with a background in IT, Data or MI lead their whole team differently than those with Analytical backgrounds in Finance or Research or Marketing backgrounds? It is an interesting question and a potential blind spot for leaders.

So, I thought I’d start by gathering some data through a quick poll. Apologies if the categories don’t work for you first time, I’ll refresh this as I get more qualitative feedback…

Segmentation

photoSegmentation is one of those customer insight and marketing terms which divide opinion. Leaders have their favourite approaches. Boards can be ardent fans of the need for a segmentation, or complete unbelievers in what is perceived as marketing “spin“. One of the reasons for this appears to be, the mixed fortunes of implementing segmentations. Some companies extol real benefits, and focus that have come as a result, whilst others bemoan wasted spend with consultants and agencies.

My own experience is that appropriate segmentations can add real value and enable a clearer understanding to focus on appropriate target audiences. But a few misconceptions need to be addressed.

The chief misconception I would cite is, the belief that any company or market only needs one segmentation. One of the guiding factors for selecting the most appropriate segmentation approach is the purpose for which that model will be used. A segmentation to guide market participation strategy, is a very different challenge, to one for new proposition development, or to target different customer treatments. For this reason, it can be beneficial for a company to have more than one way of segmenting it’s customers (even if one is considered primary when seeking to embed in culture of organisation). One analogy for this is the benefit of having a Rubik’s cube set of segmentations for decision making.

It's a misconception that a company or market only needs one segmentation Click To Tweet

Once the challenge of identifying the purpose of a segmentation is overcome, using incisive questioning, then a CI leader needs to select the most appropriate tool for the job. Here there does appear to be a degree of fashion influencing choices over the years. Many years ago, simple demographic segmentations were popular and can still perform a useful function. At the height of influence from market research teams, attitudinal segmentations were favoured and are also more viable than many believe. Since the success of Dunn Humby and others, behavioural segmentations took centre stage. Directors, particularly finance directors can favour value-based segmentation and operations directors can favour simpler life stage/“needs based” segmentations.

As all these segmentations have had their day, and still have their advocates, it is not surprising to find more organisations these days with hybrid segmentations. Popular combinations for hybrids appear to be value + life stage  or behavioural/trigger + value based segmentations. Having once achieved developing a rich attitudinal segmentation, from substantial quant research and then producing predictive models to overlay this onto a data warehouse for targeting – I regret how much attitudinal segmentations are dismissed nowadays.

However, my guidance to customer insight leaders is, to be aware of as many potential approaches as possible, and then to focus your efforts on being clear as to the purpose for any one segmentation. At the end of the day, it is not a ‘universal truth’ about customers, it is just a model to enable appropriate action.